[Approved] Caregiving

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[Approved] Caregiving

Postby Faith » Thu Dec 21, 2017 10:04 am

Name: Caregiving

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To give care is to provide what an individual needs in order to be safe and well. In terms of this skill, Caregiving means meeting needs and providing comfort. This is not medical care (that is covered in Medicine and Surgery), but this is the skill used in a variety of situations. Parents looking after a newborn or child, a family member caring for a sick relative or a teacher looking after a pupil are all examples of Caregiving. Other examples are the nurse who sits with a patient, the doctor with a good bedside manner, the priest who comforts someone or anyone who provides care and compassion to another.


What is Involved in Caregiving?

In many ways, Caregiving is a combination of other skills, driven by intent. An example could be in the preparation of a meal. To cook a meal for someone is undoubtedly demonstration of the cooking skill, but when it is prepared with the aim of providing a hearty and tasty experience to another to meet their needs, then it moves into the realm of Caregiving. The parent who ensures that their child(ren) get sufficient vegetables and do not eat too much sugar or other sweet things, is demonstrating Caregiving as is the individual who makes a meal specifically for the elderly man to tempt him to eat and gain nourishment.

Equally, sitting and having a conversation with someone might meet your own need, or be an example of socialization. However, sitting and listening to someone who is lonely or isolated, offering advice and / or support to someone in a new situation or comforting the bereaved are very much Caregiving.


Types of Caregiving:

There are two main types of Caregiving.
Reactive Caregiving: This is reacting to a situation and providing comfort or meeting needs which have arisen from that situation. Examples of this include comforting the bereaved, calming and reassuring someone who is ill, etc. In this type of Caregiving, needs tend to be emotional, but could also be providing food to the hungry, for example.

Proactive Caregiving: This is the part of the skill used by parents or those caring for the elderly, for example. This is the art of looking after someone and providing for them. This type of care is usually planned, consistent and long term. This type of Caregiving often focuses on meeting all needs, where appropriate.


Types of Recipient:

Those who receive Caregiving (the recipients) are in some ways vulnerable or have a need which they can not currently meet for themselves. Examples of recipients include (but are not limited to):

Children: From newborns needing active round-the-clock care in order to survive, to the young teen who still requires adult supervision, children are prime examples of those who receive care.

Elderly: Old age often brings with it disabilities, vulnerabilities and a general 'slowing down'. As someone progresses in age, they might well need extra help with tasks for daily living.

People with Disabilities: There are two types of disability, physical and learning, with some individuals experiencing both. Fundamentally, having a disability leads to the individual having additional needs; often these needs are met by someone providing care.

People with Illness: Whether short-term or long-term, someone who is ill is likely to need care. This is in addition to meeting medical needs.

Pregnancy & Birth: During pregnancy a woman might experience a range of physical symptoms which make daily functioning more difficult. Birth is also a time when support over and above the medical needs is required or appreciated.

People Experiencing Acute Psychological Trauma: Shock, bereavement and sudden bad news are examples of acute psychological trauma. When an individual is experiencing this, they may well need additional support in order to function.

Psychological Disorders: Mental health issues such as: anxiety, panic attacks, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. People who are experiencing these disorders will require support functioning and may, depending on the severity, need residential care or someone living with them.


Types of Need:

Physical: Physical needs are those needs we have in order to survive. Food and warmth, for example, are very basic physical needs.

Psychological:Psychological needs include the need to feel a sense of self worth, to feel loved and accepted, to be psychologically able to deal with trial-by-trial life and so on.

Safety: The need for somewhere to live which the character considers physically and psychologically 'safe'. It must be noted that this might be very different from one character to another, but is still a basic need.

Development: Children need nurturing to develop and learn, as do adults. Development needs are those which we have to help us move on in our personal learning and development.

A Note on Basic and Complex Needs
Each type of need above has basic and complex needs within them. So, a child might have the need to learn to walk. That can be accomplished without fuss or bother, but the parent who makes the child feel good about themselves, gives them a sense of accomplishment and entrenches the idea that they are proud of the child meets more advanced, complex psychological needs for acceptance. Therefore, basic needs are the ones immediately in front of the Caregiver, with complex needs being much more long term, psychological and often hidden.


Cultural / Racial Nuances:

Different areas of Idalos each have their own social norms and cultural mores surrounding care which impact on this skill. For example, on Scalvoris pregnant women are expected to rest from the early stages of their pregnancy and, should a woman be seen to be doing what is considered as overexerting herself, social pressure will be applied on her to rest. Therefore, the care needed by a pregnant woman is perceived very differently in Scalvoris than in Rharne, for example, where women have been known to work right up until just before they give birth. Whilst the woman's physical needs remain unchanged, the expectations of the society around her might well mean that she has different emotional or psychological needs as her pregnancy progresses.

Individual races will also have customs or specific situations which will be benefited by specific use of the Caregiving skill. Examples of such include:
  • As an Avriel learns to fly, walk and talk they are very human-like. However, those who are teaching them these skills do so knowing that soon, once they begin adolescence, they will become much more chaotic and aggressive. Parents of young Avriel must be aware of this and prepare their offspring, as best they can, for the inevitable time when they are sent out alone to survive.
  • The Naerrik,too, are likely to see the role of the caregiver in childhood as very different from most others. Needing to teach and learn about the shadow form and tattoo giving might impact the individual needing care, but the instilling of the Naerrik attitude means that the daughters of Augiery are treated differently from birth than, for example, your average Sev'ryn child.
Whilst these sorts of differences are not important for the meeting of basic physical needs such as hunger, they are vital to meet the more complex psychological needs. Fundamentally, to provide excellent care, one must understand the individual and we are all shaped by the society in which we live.


Related Skills:

Skills related to Caregiving include:
Medicine: The ability to treat minor illnesses and so on can provide more holistic care, treating both the illness, for example, and the psychological needs.

Psychology: Where an individual is dealing with someone who is experiencing a psychological need, a knowledge of psychology will help with both comforting the individual and working with them to overcome the issue at hand.

Teaching: When dealing with a developmental need, the ability to teach is a very genuine advantage, allowing the character to use techniques and tips at their disposal from their teaching skill.

Cooking: Providing food is meeting a physical need and the better one can cook, the more likely they are to produce food which is tempting to eat.

Endurance: Providing long term care can be physically exhausting, especially if the recipient requires round-the-clock care. Endurance can be a great bonus.

Strength: Specifically if caring for an adult who requires lifting the provision of physical assistance. Strength can be a real asset to the long-term or professional Caregiver.

Discipline: Individuals with additional needs can find the situation they are in frustrating, as can the carer. Sometimes, utilising the skill of Discipline allows the caregiver to maintain a calm and professional approach.

Etiquette: Knowing what is expected, in terms of societal norms and individual roles allows the individual giving care to meet the needs of their client more effectively and helps put people at their ease.



Novice: 0-25
The novice at this skill is undoubtedly doing their best, but they are not proficient in providing care and, often, their attempts to do so will be more about themselves than the person in need of the care. Only very basic care can be provided at this level. The recipient is usually left feeling that anything beyond their most basic needs has not been met or has been met only in a surface manner. A novice Caregiver might be good in a short-term crisis, but is not yet able to effectively plan proactive care.

Competent: 26-49
At competent, the character can provide both reactive and proactive care to a good standard. The recipient of this care will have their basic needs met, but more complex needs may not yet be being considered in all cases. This character is able to provide competent care, but when faced with complex cases, the recipient might still have only their immediate needs met and may be left feeling,vulnerable, afraid or lonely. In more usual cases, the competent caregiver is more than able to provide a good standard of care.

Expert: 50-75
The expert Caregiver is able to meet both basic and complex needs and meets them both proactively and reactively. The recipient of this Caregiving feels very cared for, their needs seeming to be paramount to the one providing the care. The character is able to provide very good care and the recipient will feel like they were very focused on.

Master: 76-100
At mastery, the Caregiver is able to meet needs that the recipient simply did not know they had and they do so with ease and efficiency. They manage to say and do just the right thing at just the right moment in order to make the recipient feel absolutely cared for. The master at Caregiving is someone who can plan excellent care, meet immediate and long-term needs, has a deep understanding of both basic and complex needs and can work both proactively and or reactively.
Credit: Faith
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Caregiving

Postby Faith » Fri Dec 22, 2017 12:43 pm

Ok done. I'd love comments, please. I was really pleased with it until I got to the skill levels and now I'm really not sure. Any feedback gratefully received!!!
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Caregiving

Postby Valeria Burhan » Fri Dec 22, 2017 9:13 pm

Overall, I'd call this a very solid write-up. You've been extremely thorough, your breakdown is neat, clear and easy to read, and I think you've covered all your bases really well. There are some relatively minor things pertaining to grammar, syntax and so on, which would affect things like clarity but they're easily corrected. Many of them are merely pieces of advice rather than straight out "this is an error".

Your skill progression is clear and to the point. I don't think that you need to make any additions, as anything extra would probably just be padding, which isn't something that you want. Other than grammar things, the only input I have pertains to related skills. Given that there is a mental, psychological and sometimes physical component for the carer, I'd recommend the addition of Endurance. As someone who's done it a lot, I know that it can be very draining and it's sometimes necessary to provide care for extended periods of time, which takes its toll. Additionally, it's sometimes necessary to move individuals. That could be assisting them if they fell out of bed onto the floor, providing them with support while they walk and so on. That's all well and good if you're talking about a child but for an adult that's a bloody difficult task. I know that I've built muscle doing it and having it certainly makes life easier so I'd recommend Strength as well.

All right so things pertaining to grammar, syntax, etc.

Under 'Reactive Caregiving': "Including" should be "include" and it would read better if "Needs in" became "Needs relating to".

Under 'Proactive Caregiving': The second sentence might be better if it was simplified to "This is the art of providing for someone".

Under 'Types of Recipient': The sentence structure is a little off here in terms of readability. It would read better if it became "Those who receive Caregiving (the recipient) are vulnerable in some way..."
  • Children: I think you're missing two commas, one just before and one just after "to the young teen".
  • People with Disabilities: The current use of learning scans a little oddly. Perhaps change it to "there are physical disabilities and learning disabilities; some people experience both." As for the second sentence, I'd suggest adding "and" after the second comma or changing the second comma to a semicolon.
  • People with Illness: I'd suggest changing "that" to "it".
  • Pregnancy & Birth: I'd suggest doing a little tweaking to the first sentence, perhaps "During pregnancy, a woman might require a caregiver as a result of physical symptoms, such as experiencing more tiredness than usual."
  • People Experiencing Acute Psychological Trauma: I think the first sentence should be slightly adjusted to something like "Shock, bereavement, sudden bad news - there are all examples of acute psychological trauma although there are many others.

Under "Types of Needs":
  • Safety: I think it'd be best if you alter the first sentence because it seems awkward. I'd advise something like "The need for a character to live somewhere they consider physically and psychologically 'safe'.
  • Development: Firstly, it might be a good idea to adjust this to 'Developmental'. Secondly, I'd advise running the first two sentences together with some slight adjustment, maybe "Children need nurturing to develop and learn, as do adults." Additionally, if you accept my first suggestion, you'll need to change the first "development" to "developmental".

Under 'A Note on Basic and Advanced Needs': I'd recommend deleting "have the" from the second sentence. The last sentence could do with some restructuring with "therefore" shifted to the beginning. Plus, it might be a good idea to consider changing the word choice so perhaps make those immediate needs "primary" and those additional, optionally fulfilled needs could be "secondary".

Under "Cultural/Racial Nuances": I'd recommend an adjustment to "pregnant women are expected to rest from the early stages of their pregnancy onward and, should a woman be seen doing what could be considered as overexerting herself, then social pressure will be applied on her to rest."

Under 'Related Skills':
  • Medicine: Perhaps a slight adjustment to "allowing treatment for both an illness, for example, and the psychological needs.
  • Cooking: You can lose the first comma, I believe.

Under "Master": Perhaps adjust it to "proactively and/or reactively" given that it's sometimes necessary to deal with both types of care simultaneously. A master would certainly be able to juggle both and I feel like that distinction should be made.

--

Otherwise I'd say keep up the good work. You're absolutely stellar, dear ;)
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Caregiving

Postby Faith » Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:54 am

Given that there is a mental, psychological and sometimes physical component for the carer, I'd recommend the addition of Endurance. As someone who's done it a lot, I know that it can be very draining and it's sometimes necessary to provide care for extended periods of time, which takes its toll. Additionally, it's sometimes necessary to move individuals. That could be assisting them if they fell out of bed onto the floor, providing them with support while they walk and so on. That's all well and good if you're talking about a child but for an adult that's a bloody difficult task. I know that I've built muscle doing it and having it certainly makes life easier so I'd recommend Strength as well.

Very good point! I've added Discipline as well - for if working with people whose behaviour is erratic / offensive etc. Thanks - great point.

All right so things pertaining to grammar, syntax, etc.

Under 'Reactive Caregiving': "Including" should be "include" and it would read better if "Needs in" became "Needs relating to".
Changed including > include and changed the other sentence completely - as a psychologist, "needs relating to" is too fluffy :P

Under 'Proactive Caregiving': The second sentence might be better if it was simplified to "This is the art of providing for someone".
Hmmm. But you can provide for someone without caring about / for them. Change not made, it doesn't fit the skill.

Under 'Types of Recipient': The sentence structure is a little off here in terms of readability. It would read better if it became "Those who receive Caregiving (the recipient) are vulnerable in some way
Hmmm. I originally wrote that - and then changed it. Because of the complex nature of those who need care (and people generally), many people with long term care needs are vulnerable in many ways. However, those in short term need of care may have a specific vulnerability. Hence, it's written that way. I'm happier with how it is, as it's more accurate.

Children: I think you're missing two commas, one just before and one just after "to the young teen".
I think just one - which I've put in!

People with Disabilities: The current use of learning scans a little oddly. Perhaps change it to "there are physical disabilities and learning disabilities; some people experience both.
Hmmm. I agree it's tricky working. I'm trying to avoid having repeated words. Ok. I've changed it completely.

As for the second sentence, I'd suggest adding "and" after the second comma or changing the second comma to a semicolon.
Semicolon all the way!

People with Illness: I'd suggest changing "that" to "it".
Changed to "whether"

Pregnancy & Birth: I'd suggest doing a little tweaking to the first sentence, perhaps "During pregnancy, a woman might require a caregiver as a result of physical symptoms, such as experiencing more tiredness than usual."
Hmmm. I'm trying to avoid the idea of a caregiver for pregnancy, so I've kept it as is and just taken the example out. Some of them I want to be obvious major needs, other less so / specific / etc.

People Experiencing Acute Psychological Trauma: I think the first sentence should be slightly adjusted to something like "Shock, bereavement, sudden bad news - there are all examples of acute psychological trauma although there are many others.
Adjusted - I haven't put in the "there are many others" as that's implicit in them being examples.

Safety: I think it'd be best if you alter the first sentence because it seems awkward. I'd advise something like "The need for a character to live somewhere they consider physically and psychologically 'safe'.
Changed!

Development: Firstly, it might be a good idea to adjust this to 'Developmental'. Secondly, I'd advise running the first two sentences together with some slight adjustment, maybe "Children need nurturing to develop and learn, as do adults." Additionally, if you accept my first suggestion, you'll need to change the first "development" to "developmental".
Err, again, I'm being a bit of a nerd here, but psychologically a development need is the appropriate term. Developmental stages and developmental psychology study processes of development, and within that they look at development needs. This is done because of actual developmental needs which refer to needs which grow and develop, perhaps as an illness progresses.

Under 'A Note on Basic and Advanced Needs': I'd recommend deleting "have the" from the second sentence. The last sentence could do with some restructuring with "therefore" shifted to the beginning. Plus, it might be a good idea to consider changing the word choice so perhaps make those immediate needs "primary" and those additional, optionally fulfilled needs could be "secondary".
Second sentence done. Therefore moved and Hmmm.
Now, see, again - I considered primary and secondary - but they aren't that. They also aren't, in fairness, basic and advanced. I kind of went with basic and advanced because that would follow through into the skill levels. Sort of meeting the right in front of you (basic) needs is one thing, but in doing so considering all the other needs there are, including the more difficult to comprehend ones. I did consider "Immediate" and... but then couldn't think of the second term.

Rumour - do you have any suggestions?

Under "Cultural/Racial Nuances": I'd recommend an adjustment to "pregnant women are expected to rest from the early stages of their pregnancy onward and, should a woman be seen doing what could be considered as overexerting herself, then social pressure will be applied on her to rest."
Done!

Medicine: Perhaps a slight adjustment to "allowing treatment for both an illness, for example, and the psychological needs.
I've kept it as is, I think it reads fine and is more open to there being more than one illness.

Cooking: You can lose the first comma, I believe.
You are correct!

Under "Master": Perhaps adjust it to "proactively and/or reactively" given that it's sometimes necessary to deal with both types of care simultaneously. A master would certainly be able to juggle both and I feel like that distinction should be made.
Absolutely right!

Thank you so much for your thorough review - really appreciated!
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Caregiving

Postby Rumour » Wed Feb 14, 2018 1:08 pm

Hi Faith,

Thanks so much for your patience with this skill write-up review! I really appreciate you putting together a write-up for Caregiving. This is definitely one of those skills that needs a write-up to help clarify its purpose and importance in the world of Idalos, and I like the details you've included. :) I've provided some feedback below for you to review and consider. More than happy to discuss anything if you have questions!

    1. Here's some minor grammar/spelling feedback:

    “In this type of Caregiving, need tend to be emotional, but could also be providing food to the hungry, for example.” > “In this type of Caregiving, needs tend to be emotional, but could also be providing food to the hungry, for example.”

    “the Naerrik shadow form / tattoo giving which might impact on the individual needing care.” > “the Naerrik shadow form / tattoo giving which might impact the individual needing care.”

    “Where an individual is dealing with someone who is experiencing a psychological need, a knowledge of psychology will help in not just comforting the individual, but working with them to overcome the issue at hand.” > “Where an individual is dealing with someone who is experiencing a psychological need, a knowledge of psychology will help with both comforting the individual and working with them to overcome the issue at hand.”

    “Only very basic care can be provided at this level, the recipient is usually left feeling that their needs have not been met or have been met only in a surface manner.” > “Only very basic care can be provided at this level. The recipient is usually left feeling that their needs have not been met or have been met only in a surface manner.”

    2. “Individual races will also have customs or specific situations such as an Avriel learning to fly, for example, or the Naerrik shadow form / tattoo giving which might impact on the individual needing care.” Would you be able to expand a bit more on why how this is related to caregiving and what the caregiver’s role might be? Additionally, would you be able to include a few more cultural or racial examples of differences in Caregiving? I think this section may be a smidge unclear to me.

    3. Basic/Advanced Needs - You had asked me to weigh in on this. I can see an argument both for Primary/Secondary (per Maslow's hierarchy of needs) and Basic/Advanced. Another alternative might be Basic/Complex, where psychological and emotional needs are more complex and physical needs like food, shelter, and safety are more basic.

    4. I think the only thing I really feel is missing from this write-up is the how. How does a character go about practicing caregiving and improving on this skill? What tactics and techniques does a caregiver use? You've touched on it briefly under Reactive vs. Proactive, but I would love to see this expanded on so it's super clear for characters how they would show this skill in writing and how it differentiates itself from, say, cooking when their character cooks a meal for a dependent. What are the typical responsibilities or duties of a Caregiver? What are the fundamentals or basic principles of being a good Caregiver?

Give me a shout if you have any questions or want to talk this one through! Thanks again for an awesome write-up, and looking forward to getting it posted live.

Cheers,
Ru
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Caregiving

Postby Faith » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:33 am

Thanks for the awesome, useful, fab feedback. Rumour! Ok. So.

    1. Here's some minor grammar/spelling feedback:

    All done!

    2. “Individual races will also have customs or specific situations such as an Avriel learning to fly, for example, or the Naerrik shadow form / tattoo giving which might impact on the individual needing care.” Would you be able to expand a bit more on why how this is related to caregiving and what the caregiver’s role might be? Additionally, would you be able to include a few more cultural or racial examples of differences in Caregiving? I think this section may be a smidge unclear to me.

    Well - yes and no. What I've done is expanded the three examples there (pregnancy in different societies, Avriel and Naerrik. I'm happy to add more, but I feel a little like it would be over labouring the point now. What do you think? Really happy to add more, but didn't want it to become a treatise on Sociology, you know?

    3. Basic/Advanced Needs - You had asked me to weigh in on this. I can see an argument both for Primary/Secondary (per Maslow's hierarchy of needs) and Basic/Advanced. Another alternative might be Basic/Complex, where psychological and emotional needs are more complex and physical needs like food, shelter, and safety are more basic.
    Excellent - have amended

    4. I think the only thing I really feel is missing from this write-up is the how. How does a character go about practicing caregiving and improving on this skill? What tactics and techniques does a caregiver use? You've touched on it briefly under Reactive vs. Proactive, but I would love to see this expanded on so it's super clear for characters how they would show this skill in writing and how it differentiates itself from, say, cooking when their character cooks a meal for a dependent. What are the typical responsibilities or duties of a Caregiver? What are the fundamentals or basic principles of being a good Caregiver?

OMG! It's like I wrote up Carpentry and forgot to talk about how it's to do with like... wood. New section added!

Thank you so much for this feedback! I think it'll really make the skill better!
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Caregiving

Postby Pepper » Fri Mar 16, 2018 4:25 pm

Awesome writeup :) This isn't a feedback as such but more of a 'does this include this' question. I have noticed that a few people have the knack of making people really comfortable. You'll find yourself with your feet up, a glass of something comforting in your hand and pouring out all your troubles before you know it. Their homes are always very welcoming and somehow nurturing. Would this be also a sort of psychological caregiving? It does have elements of housekeeping but I somehow feel it'd be a better fit here.. What do you folks think?
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Caregiving

Postby Faith » Sun Mar 18, 2018 10:26 am

Pepper wrote:Awesome writeup :) This isn't a feedback as such but more of a 'does this include this' question. I have noticed that a few people have the knack of making people really comfortable. You'll find yourself with your feet up, a glass of something comforting in your hand and pouring out all your troubles before you know it. Their homes are always very welcoming and somehow nurturing. Would this be also a sort of psychological caregiving? It does have elements of housekeeping but I somehow feel it'd be a better fit here.. What do you folks think?


I think that it could certainly be played that way and yes, that's part of psychological caregiving. I'm not sure that I'd want to add it to the write up, per se, as we can't really cover all examples - but it would be one. I guess it would be a sort of "peripheral" example, if that makes sense? Were you thinking it should be added to the write up?
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Caregiving

Postby Pepper » Mon Mar 19, 2018 4:37 am

No no.. it was just a question since the writeup focuses on caring for babies or patients of some sort. I wondered if there isn't a 'patient' as such, does it still apply. I was thinking of how to communicate something that good b&b owners seem to have. A genuine interest in people + a desire to make everything pleasant etc.. Reading the skills caregiving seemed to fit best but it turned out to be more geared to patient and infant care :) That's why the question.
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Postby Faith » Mon Mar 19, 2018 6:28 am

Pepper wrote:No no.. it was just a question since the writeup focuses on caring for babies or patients of some sort. I wondered if there isn't a 'patient' as such, does it still apply. I was thinking of how to communicate something that good b&b owners seem to have. A genuine interest in people + a desire to make everything pleasant etc.. Reading the skills caregiving seemed to fit best but it turned out to be more geared to patient and infant care :) That's why the question.


Cool! That's great feedback - thank you!
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